Measuring the inclusiveness of international financing to tourism in Latin America and the Caribbean

  • 1061 Views
  • 64 Downloads

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Globally, tourism has been identified as a means of poverty reduction and development, and as a means of encouragement of females, minorities and small businesses to better engage in the mainstream of economic life. This paper examines whether the international and governmental financial support, grated by international financial institutions, is effectively achieving these aims in Latin America and the Caribbean. A series of indices are established in the paper that assess the extent to which such funding includes non-corporate enterprise while also considering the volume and nature of such funding. It is concluded that the goals of inclusiveness are not being met.

view full abstract hide full abstract
    • Figure 1. Indicators: Objective: Financial inclusion of women and SMEs, by organization
    • Figure 2. Projects whose final beneficiaries are other companies and SMEs, by organizations (indicators B4 and B5)
    • Figure 3. Evolution of the mean year-on-year rate of variation in the portfolio of recipients, indicator B7 (1991–2012)
    • Figure 4. Indicator C12: Mean year-on-year rate of variation in the total amount of funding provided for tourism (2000–2012)
    • Figure 5. Indicators D6, D7, D8, D9, D10 and D11, financial instruments used by the IFIs for the funding of tourism, by organization
    • Table 1. Survey fact sheet
    • Table 2. Indicators of the level of financial inclusion in the development objectives of the projects
    • Table 3. Indicators of the scope and growth of the portfolio of clients and end beneficiaries of the funding
    • Table 4. Indicators of aspects related to the volume of funding
    • Table 5. Indicators for the study of the characteristics of the funding
    • Table 6. Indicators of non-financial support for inclusion
    • Table 7. Evaluation of the financial inclusion measurement tool
    • Table 8. Indicators of the level of financial inclusion in the development objectives of the projects, results
    • Table 9. Indicators of the scope and growth of the portfolio of clients and end beneficiaries of the funding, results
    • Table 10. Indicators of aspects related to the volume of funding, results
    • Table 11. Indicators for the study of the characteristics of the funding, results
    • Table 12. Indicators of non-financial assistance for financial inclusion, results
    • Table 13. Standardized results of the tool by indicator
    • Table 14. Standardized results of the tool, by section and overall